RESEARCH ARTICLE


Features of the Lipid Profile in Patients with Arterial Hypertension and Cardiovascular Diseases According to Smoking Status



Oleg V. Gaisenok1, 2, Sergey Yu. Martsevich2, Marina V. Leonova3, *
1 Department of Cardiology, United Hospital with outpatient Department, Moscow, Russia
2 Department of Preventive Pharmacotherapy, National Research Center for Preventive Medicine, Moscow, Russia
3 Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Russian National Research Medical University N.I. Pirogov,Russia


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© 2018 Gaisenok et al.

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode). This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Corresponding authorAddress correspondence to this author at the Russian National Research Medical University N.I. Pirogov, Ostrovityanov str. 1, Moscow, Russia, 117997; Tel: +79153204379; E-mail: anti23@mail.ru


Abstract

Introduction:

Smoking is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The direct influence of smoking status on the lipid profile was highlighted in patients with arterial hypertension and associated cardiovascular disease.

Objective:

We aimed to evaluate lipid profile among patients related to smoking status in a registry-based cohort study.

Methods:

The data of registry of National Research Сenter of Preventive Medicine were conducted. Patients filled in the special questionnaire in order to identify their smoking status, statins therapy.

Results:

274 patients were included; main nosologic disease was arterial hypertension (230 patients), 14.8% were smokers, 62.9% non-smokers, and 22.2% past-smokers. The rank analysis of variations by Kruskal-Wallis (H) test for multiple comparisons between groups revealed significant differences in lipid levels for patients according to smoking status: total cholesterol H (2, n=234) =9.119, p=0.0105; LDL-cholesterol H (2, n=225) =6.2615, p=0.0437; triglycerides H (2, n=216) =9.8485, p=0.0073; these indicators of lipid profile among non-smoking patients were lower than among smokers, these indices among past-smokers were lower than among smokers. The absence of statistically significant differences between groups was confirmed in statin therapy (χ2 =3.169, df=4, p=0.529). Logistic regression analysis was conducted to identify factors that influence achievement target lipid levels. Only 2 statistically significant signs were identified in this model: smoking (OR 0.1; 95%CI [0.13;4.87]; p=0.03) and statin therapy (OR 8.2;95%CI [-3.6; -,078]; p=0.002).

Conclusion:

Significantly higher lipid levels have been observed in smokers compared to non-smokers in patients with arterial hypertension and associated cardiovascular disease. Smoking is a great factor disincentive to achieve target lipid levels.

Keywords: Arterial hypertension, Cardiovascular diseases, Lipid-lowering therapy, Statins, Cholesterol, Low density lipoprotein cholesterol, Smoking status, Registry.